Flexible Seating, A Reflection 5 years In

It seems like flexible seating is everywhere on social media and it makes my heart happy.  Last year Molly wrote about not having chairs in our classrooms and how our classrooms function without chairs. I would refer back to this article if you are curious about how it looks. Why We Don’t Have Chairs

When I came to Queen Anne Elementary and saw Molly didn’t have chairs in her classroom, I immediately said “ I don’t want chairs either” and I haven’t looked back. What’s funny, is five years ago it seems really progressive to me to not have chairs in a classroom and I remember getting plenty of strange looks from my teacher friends at other schools. “But where will they sit?” “How do you know they won’t just wander around all day?” “What if they sit/stand on the tables?” ( gasp! Something I’ve been known to do a time or two). Now I come into my classroom and it just seems normal to not have chairs. I still get asked from time to time “But why don’t you have chairs?” There is a variety of reasons but what always strikes me in our research driven school environment, is where is the data that shows students are more engaged sitting in chairs? Or the data that shows it’s healthy to have students sit in chairs for hours upon hours? There isn’t any  research that I know of that suggests that a more traditional classroom with students sitting in chairs for hours is engaging or healthy for students. What I’m reading is more and more research about the benefits of standing tables and low tables, both for engagement and health purposes.

I believe we made great strides when we took our desks out of rows. But we stopped moving forward when we simply rearranged the furniture putting students into desk/table groups. We need to continue to strive to make the best learning environment possible for our students and that includes flexible seating choice.

One issue I’ve seen floating around social media from teachers interested in flexible seating is how to give up control when you ditch the chairs. My response? Chairs don’t give you control nor do they engage students. So it’s not really giving up any control. It might be challenging to your sense of order as a teacher,  however engaging teaching and strong classroom management does more to create a positive learning environment than chairs ever have. If you are on the fence about flexible seating this year, I urge you to give it a go. I am so thankful that Molly challenged my thinking on seating in the classroom five years ago. Losing chairs inspired me to create more engaging content, sharpen my classroom management skills and gave my students more choice within their classroom.

My Why -Making a Difference in the Lives of My Students

Every summer I look forward to more time for exercise and usually that means a daily walk with something playing in my ear.  Last week, it was Simon Sinek’s Ted Talk on how great leaders inspire action.  This talk is not specifically about education but  as usual, as I was listening , my brain started thinking about school.  In his talk, Sinek  explains what he believes make organizations  and leadership successful.  He says that the great leaders and organizations in the world are motivated, by what he calls, the golden circle or the why, how and what.  And as he explained this theory, I was already applying it to what I have learned about teaching.   In  our job, we all know what we are supposed to do -educate students.   And we are usually given the how – curriculum, supplies, professional development.  But Sinek would argue that for most, it’s the why  that  is unclear.  He says that very few people and organizations in the world know why they do what they do.   What’s  your purpose,  your cause or belief, he asks.  Why do any of us get up in the morning?    Why do we teach?

I know why.  And it’s more than just wanting to make sure my students are academically proficient.   I want my 1st grade students to know how to learn, to ask questions,  to collaborate with each other, to be able to solve problems and to push themselves to learn more.  I want them be  concerned, confident and compassionate citizens of the world.

Alicia and I are lucky enough to  work at an elementary school that was built on the foundation of 5 pillars. These pillars not only guide our students ( K-5) but they provide the framework for our teaching.    These pillars are “my why.”

We are self-directed learners

We encourage each other to think critically and learn more

We are concerned, confident and compassionate citizens of the world

We earn everywhere, we learn together

We are creative

In my classroom, students are learning to read, write, and work with numbers.  They are doing projects and using technology to connect, capture and create new learning.  But I know now that it’s the work we do around these pillars that drive my instruction and their learning.  There is so much pressure around test scores and academics and yet very few administrators seem to care how we are teaching students these 21st century skills.   I have learned that it’s these skills that push my students to think critically and learn more.  It’s our daily classroom meetings that build community and help us work together to solve problems.  It’s a mindset for learning that is explicitly taught.

We start the year by learning step by step what it means to be a self directed learner.  Then we do the same to define what it means to be a critical thinker.  And every day of the year we practice persistence, optimism, empathy, and resilience. This is why my students and my fellow teachers at Queen Anne Elementary are successful.  It’s why I love my job, and why I look forward to getting to school each morning.   I would love to hear your why.   And of course, here’s the link to Simon Sinek’s Ted Talk.

 

~Molly

 

 

 

 

Learning With Our Twitter Buddies

We are very lucky at our school to have a math specialist. Ms. Francisco is known throughout the school as a math lover and this year, she created math challenges that brought her love of math to all students in the school. I am going to link her website complete with all the challenges she created at the bottom of this blog post. I highly recommend checking out her site.

This year, we participated in the primary blogging community and connected with another first grade classroom outside of Toronto. We enjoyed blogging back and forth greatly but what was most impactful in our classroom throughout the year, was our tweets back and forth. One day, we were working on the math challenge as a class and my class tweeted how engaging but hard the challenge was this week. Our buddy classroom instantly tweeted back “What math challenge?” We explained and shared the math challenge site with our buddies for the upcoming week. Usually,we worked on the math challenges on Friday’s however, our buddy classroom began tweeting at us on Monday morning–they were so excited by it and couldn’t wait to share their work! The challenge that week was to design the new gym our school will be building in a few years using 60 cubes/squares on graph paper, taking into account what type space makes a good gym. We quickly got out the cubes, iPads, and graph paper and went to work. What amazed me the most were the thoughtful conversations students were having as they designed. While they quickly realized a long, narrow 3 x 20 gym would not be ideal for many activities, they thought it could be fun do timed sprints in! One other thing we did while we shared our answers with our buddy classroom through twitter, we also projected student work up on the project through AirServer. AirServer is one of the more powerful tools we have access to–showcasing different student thinking/work, drives all of our students to create and produce more. Below are some examples of student work, students collaborating and a picture of the great work displayed up on our AirServer.

 

By using Twitter to share our learning with our buddies and receiving feedback from them, student work was elevated and so was engagement. My students are always excited to work on the math challenge, but when they had another, audience to share their work with, their engaged soared. I am excited to for next year’s math challenges and to share our learning with other authentic audiences through Twitter.

 

Ms. Francisco’s blog complete with math challenges! http://qaeacademic-support.weebly.com/math-challenges.html